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Norwegian eye witness to the terror

(Foto. Scanpix/REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko)
When the bomb went off outside the National Hotel in Moscow just before 11 a.m. local time Tuesday, Norwegian Amund Myklebust sat in the lobby bar.

The Norwegian business man felt the bomb’s force when the two female suicide bombers blew themselves up outside the luxury hotel in downtown Moscow.

“I was inside the building and had a meeting in the lobby bar,” Myklebust explained on the phone from Moscow. “We immediately understood that it was a bomb. There was a terrible noise and the ground shock.”

According to reports from Russian media Tuesday afternoon, at least eight people were killed in the explosion and at least ten were reported injured.

Saw the injured and the dying

The bomb went off just outside the main entrance to the hotel and in the chaos that followed Myklebust saw the injured and the dying laying on the street outside.

“I was outside and looked around before they got the area sealed off,” Myklebust said. “Dead people were laying on the sidewalk. They were carrying the injured people into the lobby.

He said he of course think about how frightfully close he was the bomb that was detonated just before 11 a.m. local time.

“It is rather strange,” Myklebust stated. “I came to the hotel 10:10 a.m. local time, and we had scheduled the meeting at 10 p.m. yesterday. It is snowing and about zero degrees in Moscow and there could have been delays. It just makes it go cold down your back when you are that close. You think about the fine line between life and death.”

In spite of the horrifying experience, Myklebust’s day continues.

“I just have to continue working,” Myklebust stated. “I’m going home to Norway tomorrow night and the things on my schedule must be followed.”

Warned this weekend

Myklebust stated that he often travels to Moscow and that he has never been afraid when he moves around in the city. However, he was warned this weekend not to take the underground because people feared that something would happen in connection with the parliamentary election Sunday.

“Election was Sunday, and everyone was relived when nothing happened,” Myklebust said. “Some people were afraid to take the underground and things like that. Most people were probably starting to relax now.”

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